Plastic Christmas


A TYROLEAN BOY SITTING ON A ROLLED PAPER LOG, HIS BODY IS MADE OF A RED FLOCKED SOFT MOLDED PLASTIC WITH HAND PAINTED FACIAL FEATURES , COULD BE CELLULOID.
Made in Japan

THE LAST ORNAMENT LOOKS LIKE A TYROLEAN ELF WITH A WHITE FLOCKED HARD PLASTIC BODY. HE STANDS ON A BROWN FLOCKED LOG WITH A MUSHROOM SPROUTING OUT OF IT.
Made in Japan

LITTLE DRUMMER BOYS WITH FELT BODIES, WIRED ARMS, HARD PLASTIC MOLDED HEAD WITH HAND PAINTED FACES, PLAYING ON THEIR CARDBOARD DRUMS.
Made in Japan
starting price $5.99here


FLOCKED VINTAGE REINDEERS
Made in Japan
starting price $3 here

AMERICA’S HISTORY
By the late 1940’s, World War II had ended, the American economy experienced tremendous growth, people by the droves moved into the suburbs, and as a result, the country was transformed into a consumer nation. With the country’s new-found prosperity came a sense of renewed patriotism and the desire to purchase products that were “Made in America”.

After years of war restrictions, and the lack of manufacturing, consumers’ tastes changed from European made decorations to those made in the USA. Additionally, products imported from Japan and Hong Kong also became fashionable. This new era of wealth, manufacturing and consumerism had a profound effect on the way we purchased and decorated for the holidays.

Due to an abundance of new materials and modern methods of mass production, Christmas ornaments and figurines during this period were relatively inexpensive and easy to produce. Light-weight decorations made of hard plastic, Styrofoam, aluminum and other non-breakable materials are characteristic of the 1950’s and 60’s. Santas, angels, bells, candles, lights and a myriad of other novelty ornaments in festive colors of red, white and green flooded the market.
(from Golden Glow)

JAPAN’S UNKNOWN CHRISTMAS HISTORY
In 1639 National Isolation was imposed upon Japan, and most Christians changed their religion at that time, but some, especially the Kakure (secret Christians), kept Christmas in secret all through the persecution.

In 1854, American navy Commodore Perry opened National Isolation and Japan began to take to Western culture like a dry sponge to water.

But Christmas was not well known at that time. In 1875 in Harajo School in the Ginza area of Tokyo, Christmas was celebrated. It was strange and amusing because Santa Claus appeared dressed like a Samurai.

In Taisho period (1912-1926) a lot of Western countries began ordering Christmas decorations and toys from Japan in stead of from Germany. Japanese manufacturers made Christmas lights for the tree, and dolls of Santa Claus for ornamentation, some were made of celluloid. And Aluminium artificial Christmas Trees came from Japan also. These Christmas things were getting pretty common and easy to find in Western department stores and toy shops after WWII.

A lot of beautiful Christmas customs had come to Japan from America, and in return occupied Japan was exporting christmas decorations, toys and china. During that time Japan was like Santa Claus’ Toyland Factory. This continued until Hong Kong and Taiwan became famous for exporting goods.
(from Christmas Archives)

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